Job Days No. 5

Well so what I’ve usually done these in March, this is my fiefdom and I do as I please! And besides, there is some precedence, as my second such post was done in April of 2014, rather than the somewhat arbitrarily agreed-upon date of March 23 on which many of the others have fallen.

RELATED: Job Days No. 4

I’m making it now, because I have lots of reason to be evaluating my place in this job/career world. I’ve now started year five (5!) with my current employer. This means that in all likelihood, I’ve already worked there for more days than I had during my time in the Charlotte blindness workshop location, as I never quite worked a five-day week there.

As fate would have it, I’m about done working five-day weeks here as well, at least for the foreseeable future. Yeah that grad school thing? And the important sleep thing? Don’t, quite, mix. And, that is causing big problems at the workfront, as the latter wishes to take me away at wholly inopportune times, prompting intervention from substitute supervisors. I do respect that lady though, as she not only gave a verbal notification, but was also willing to listen to my challenges and help me initiate the solution, which is to downgrade to four days. I just need more time to master these massive projects coming down the line at me now.

So that’s the biggest change. Let’s take a look at how much my routine has altered since last year. In order to really capture it, I write this post prior to having reviewed the last entry. I don’t want to be influenced by the nuance, after all.

4:45: Alarm sounds, whether it is needed depends on the day (see above). Out of bed, shower, dress.
5:05: iPhone in hand to begin reading until and after departure, even on six-minute walk to bus. Had been pleasure-reading, but academics are taking a larger and larger chunk of my time. (In one book this week, for example, we have to read from pp. 1-86, and 157-198. And about seven other articles! Where is that kind of time, y’all?)
5:32: Hop onto bus and resume reading, which had stopped so that safe street crossing could be had. Continue reading for 18-minute ride to Durham Station.
5:50: Chat with other regulars, (esp person who works six days a week, often from 7 AM-9 PM, and I thought my day was long!) Bemoan hot, cold, wind, rain, whatever the flavor of the day is, until bus pulls in (hopefully on time at 6 AM).
6: Listen to podcasts as GoTriangle 700 Express Route whisks me along Durham Freeway and I-40 E with no stops, to arrive at 6:15.
6:20: Stand in increasingly long line as people attempt to clock in with newfangled (touch-ID) tech, get buzzer that says “try again!” Finally check in and walk to break room, where podcast listening recommences. Fire off arrival text to fiance, usually about having missed sleep yet again.
6:35: Read other book on Braille display till time to go in.

As far as the actual work goes, I still do the same job of packaging light sticks. I have managed to gain another order of magnitude in speed, and now can go just about as quickly as the fastest person back there. So I finally rarely get complaints about that, unless they are about how we’ve gone too quickly and thus have run out of work. It is hard to win in there!

And that’s about all. As usual, I am crossing my fingers that year five will be my last, but with the increasing depth and richness of my network, this has never seemed more likely. Let’s see if I can secure this Master’s degree first, which does appear to take some doing on my part. I’ve just got to find my feet right now, but am still ok on the whole.

So, how long have you worked with your current employer? For class, we’re reading a book by Dalton Conley called Elsewhere U.S.A, in which he proposes that job mobility has not actually changed as much as we think, and that most still work the same place for 20 years whether they like it or not. That book was written in 2008 though, and so I find it rather difficult to believe this still holds true. I think even over the last ten years, things have changed significantly. But probably more on that in an upcoming post on my audio editing fun as I attempt to create a podcast for this class. Till then, keep rockin’ and a-rollin’ and workin’ in the coal mine!

5 Responses to Job Days No. 5

  1. Yes, here’s to making Year Five your LAST ONE there! I remember as a girl going with my dad to a sheltered workshop for the blind in Seattle. It was called Lighthouse for the Blind. One of the things they produced there (this was the early 1960s) was cloth ribbon on huge spools. Or maybe they just packaged it. Who knows? My family had one spool of pink ribbon and one of red. I still have the red; gave away the pink. Anyway, I am glad that such places exist, but am sending good thoughts for other employment for you!
    NPR, commercial radio, blog, commentator?

    • Hi. Yes, I’ve heard of the Seattle Lighthouse, almost got hired there to work in a higher department but that fell through. It might have been odd to move that far. At present I’m glad these places exist, since still too few will give us a shot, but that’s just it, I’m more hoping the rest of the market opens up. Trying to do my little part to make that happen. And trying to figure out just which of those slots I will slip into. We’ll see if I have any talent as I attempt to put this podcast together.

      • Wow, coincidence that you were considering working at Lighthouse for the Blind. I wonder if you would have liked Seattle. It is a very progressive town in a lot of ways, and people are generally more accepting of differences than in other places. (Worst discrimination I saw was when a Greyhound bus driver in Idaho tried to kick him, his guide dog, mom and me off the bus in the 1950s – no dogs allowed!) But Seattle is not really all that friendly. Polite, but not friendly as in Texas, for example. I have never been south of Virginia, but have always heard and read about the famous Southern hospitality.

        • Yeah, one of the strange things about the south in my experience anyway is yeah they ACT friendly, but when it comes down to it people are not as helpful as in, say, New York. They tend to prefer to stay out of situations that might be difficult, as in I tried to ask someone for assistance in making sure I got off the bus in the right place once and he/she slid away from me. In NYC or Boston, they automatically ask which subway line I need. So I do like Southern hospitality mostly, but it can have a degree of fakeness to it as well.

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